Experts Explain Why Introverts Make Awesome Parents

Experts Explain Why Introverts Make Awesome Parents

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Introverts make wonderful parents.

But, it comes with a few challenges. Being the quiet parent in the playground is likely to get you a few glances from other parents, but there are some perks of having introvert characteristics. If you enjoy the quiet time and the calmer side of things with your child, experts believe that being an introverted parent can be of benefit to you and your child.

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The author of ‘Introverts in Love: The Quiet Way to Happily Ever after’, Sophia Dembling states that there are various benefits to being an introvert in this beautiful and extremely wild world of parenthood. This sentiment is something that the brain science professor and psychologist Susan Krauss Whitbourne of the University of Massachusetts agrees with.

Here are some reasons that support expert claims about why introverts make awesome parents:

They are in tune with kids needs

An introverted parent is likely to be more in tune with the children’s feeling to the point that theu can understand it on a deeper level. Dr Whitbourne says, “They tend to be more inward-oriented as the name [introvert] implies, and therefore, more thoughtful, more quiet, and perhaps more aware of their inner state.”

They are surprisingly warm

Introverts are not in your face kind of people, and this does not mean that they are unfriendly. According to Dr Whitbourne, “an introvert can be warm, caring, and interested in people just like everyone else.” So, the next time you take your kinds to the playground and you see a quiet parent around, be kind enough to say hello.

They are excellent listeners

To communicate with the kid is one of the primary motives that a parent desires to have from when a child is at a young age This is accompanied by being a good listener, and most introverts have this knack. Sophia states, “introverted people are excellent listeners,” they are also good at dealing with kids who are known to keep quiet. An introverted parent will sit quietly beside a child who wants to play quietly.

They tend to avoid conflict

Introverts tend to back off when conversations are tense, and they do not like shouting and yelling. Sophia states that “they keep things to themselves and avoid conflict.” There is a chance you might notice the parent being passive at first when their child is having a meltdown at the playground.

Selective with whom they give attention to

Introverts, in general, are quiet and reserved. Therefore, it is a big deal if they consider you to be of importance in their lives. Sophia explains “introverted people do not need a lot of relationships. They are selective about who they give their time and attention to, so they tend to be very loyal and invest deeply when they decide to invest.” Their offsprings benefit significantly from this.

They do not typically thrive in chaotic social situations

Being in a crowd of over-hyped screaming children is not something introverts look forward to. According to Dr Whitbourne, “it can be a struggle for an introvert to enjoy themselves at events such as kids parties. However, on the positive end, there are plenty of extroverted parents ready to jump in, so they are not going to stand out as much if they happen to blend a bit into the background.” it is not a bad thing to blend into the background, it shows that you are child-oriented more than self-focused. It is an excellent parenting trait.

They love hanging out at home

It is often known that some of the most memorable memories can be made in your backyard, and people with introvert characteristics do know how to capitalize on it. It can be cuddling with a bowl of popcorn, making arts and crafts with the kids, playing in the backyard with the pet, or doing wheelies. The home is the best place an introvert wants to be. According to Sophia, “your kids will have someone to sit quietly with on the couch and someone who is not afraid of silence.”

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